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Category Archives: Homemade

Lamp work beads, some of the pieces that go into our tin ornaments.

As we are creating bunches and bunches of tin ornaments for the holidays, I thought I would show you some of the pieces that go into our unique ornaments.

Lampworking is a type of glasswork that uses gas fueled torch to melt rods and tubes of clear and colored glass. Once in a molten state, artists will shape and blow using tools and hand movements.

Each bead is unique…although you might find the exact same bead color and all….they will not be exactly alike.

Many of our tin ornaments have unique “mini pieces of art” each different be it a lamp work bead, recycled charms from vintage pieces or other additional handmade “trinkets” to make each tin ornament unique and special.

Hope to see you at this seasons craft fair events!

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What is an Urban Hobo

What is an Urban Hobo

For those that may not be familiar with “Hobos”, it may help to give you brief history.

The first recorded use of the term Hobo appeared in the Western U.S. around 1890. However, the Hobo movement begun much earlier, right after the end of the Civil War. It is not clear where the term Hobo originated. Some suggest the origins come from the farming term hoe-boy meaning “farmhand”. Others suggest that it comes from the railroad greeting Ho beau, or the syllabic abbreviation of homeward bound (i.e., HO BO). Essentially a Hobo was a migratory laborer, a wandering worker. Due to economic strife, it was necessary for many men to leave home in search of work. Hobos are closely associated to the railroad. As they moved across the country, the railroad was the preferred mode of transportation. Sooner or later hobos would return home to their families. Over time, the term hobo became synonymous with “Tramp” and “Bum”. Hobos were neither! The difference being that hobos travelled to work. Tramps travelled looking for handouts. They only worked when absolutely necessary. Bums seldom if ever travelled, and never worked. Hobos even developed a strict code of ethics which they lived by, something neither tramps or bums concerned themselves with. The code of ethics read as follows;

1. Decide your own life, don’t let another person run or rule you.
2. When in town, always respect the local law and officials, and try to be a gentleman at all times.
3. Don’t take advantage of someone who is in a vulnerable situation, locals or other hobos.
4. Always try to find work, even if temporary, and always seek out jobs nobody wants. By doing so you not only help a business along, but ensure employment should you return to that town again.
5. When no employment is available, make your own work by using your added talents at crafts.
6. Do not allow yourself to become a stupid drunk and set a bad example for locals’ treatment of other hobos.
7. When jungling (i.e., camping) in town, respect handouts, do not wear them out, another hobo will be coming along who will need them as bad, if not worse than you.
8. Always respect nature, do not leave garbage where you are jungling.
9. If in a community jungle, always pitch in and help.
10. Try to stay clean, and boil up wherever possible.
11. When traveling, ride your train respectfully, take no personal chances, cause no problems with the operating crew or host railroad, act like an extra crew member.
12. Do not cause problems in a train yard, another hobo will be coming along who will need passage through that yard.
13. Do not allow other hobos to molest children, expose all molesters to authorities, they are the worst garbage to infest any society.
14. Help all runaway children, and try to induce them to return home.
15. Help your fellow hobos whenever and wherever needed, you may need their help someday.
16. If present at a hobo court and you have testimony, give it. Whether for or against the accused, your voice counts!

Today, the term Hobo evokes a romantic image of someone who took charge of their own destiny and embraced their spirit of adventure. Someone who lived their own life by their own rules. Someone who followed their own path.

Urban Hobo pays tribute to the Hobo spirit by encouraging others to embrace their spirit of adventure by exploring their city, state or region. Embrace your own sense of style and taste. Live your own life. Choose your own path.

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Tools…Juan’s Perspective

One of the things that gives our art work a unique character are the tools we use. These aren’t just any run-of-the-mill hardware store tools. These tools have a history. A soul. Many of them belonged to our parents and grandparents. We don’t simply enjoy using them because of their family history. It goes much deeper than that, because we each grew up using these very same tools. And, each of them has provenance. Each of these tools were used in a professional trade.

Here are a few examples of the tools we currently employ in our tin work. The two dollies were used by my Grandpa Smith in his Radiator/Body Shop in the 1920’s, ‘30’s and ‘40’s. Back when cars were made from actual steel. If you needed to shape a new body part or re-shape a damaged one, you would place the appropriate dolly behind the piece of steel and pound on the other side with a hammer, until the desired shape was achieved. These dollies are made from solid blocks of steel. After they were retired to my Grandfather’s personal workshop, I used them for many “important” projects when I was a kid. I even used them to pound out a few dents in friend’s cars.

One of the ball peen hammers belonged to my Grandpa Swinford. He used it in his carpentry business and I used it when I first learned to hammer nails (it was a lot lighter than a claw hammer and I hit the wood as often as I hit the nail, so it really didn’t matter if it was the right tool or not).

The other ball peen hammer belonged to Shawn’s Mother, Phyllis. She used it in her Art Gallery. Shawn spent a lot of time working in the gallery and used it to hang pictures.

Each of these tools were originally used professionally, for years, in artful endeavors. Over time they developed scars and wear and characters all their own. These very tools were used by our parents and grandparents to teach us skills and pass along a little bit of their knowledge. We are carrying on that tradition by using them in our own artful endeavors. Used together, they shape our tin work and give each piece a unique appearance and a little bit of history all their own.

 

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New Inventory at Urban-Hobo.com

 

Going…Going…GONE!

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Wow! Dia de los Muertos has taken off for Urban Hobos! Juan and I are so excited. We have been able to sell many of our “Folk-Art” Skull friends. The colors are bright the subject (although skeletons) is fun and native to the area we live in.

I do not know why we have taken this road with a Dia de Los Muertos theme, I grew up celebrating this special holiday with many friends since I grew up on the border. I’ve enjoyed sharing with Juan the meaning behind the “Day of the Dead” celebrations.

For my friends and readers that are not familiar… Día de los Muertos is a holiday celebrated throughout Mexico and around the world in other cultures. Focusing on family gatherings and friends to pray for and remember family members who have died. The celebration takes place on November 1, in connection with the Catholic holidays of All Saints’ Day. Some of the traditions connected with the holiday include building altars honoring the deceased using sugar skulls, marigolds, and the favorite foods and beverages of the departed and visiting graves with these as gifts. They   also leave possessions of the deceased.

I know I know….many of you might think this is slightly gruesome celebrating with skeletons and honoring a day for the dead, however, I love the bright colors and festivities that come from the celebration. When I think how much I miss my Father, I would much rather honor him and think of him with happy and wonderful memories. Remembering all he taught me and the great traditions that are now in me.

However, we do have some more “Dia de los Muertos” on its way along with a series of crosses I am working on and will have ready in the next week. So I will do my best to keep you posted on any new products we have.

Be sure to “LIKE US” on Facebook as well. Would love any and all feedback too!

 

Roses are Red…Violets are Blue…

Roses are red….Violets are blue…We’ve got a great Valentine’s gift (for purchase) for you!
Wow!!!! It seems like yesterday we were enjoying the Christmas Holiday Cheer. Now we are just about to hit February 14th, Valentine’s Day. The annual commemoration celebrating love and affection between two people! (Awww)

I know it can be “Very Commercialized”… Nothing says love like a diamond”…”Tell her you love her with a romantic dinner at this very expensive place”… Juan is pretty lucky in that sense. For me, being a couple and being my best friend is NOT about one day a year…it’s about the other 364 days of the year too. I much rather receive something sweet and simple as a handmade card or homemade anything. To me that comes from the heart!

In keeping with those same sentiments, Juan and I are making/baking/shaking away over the next couple of weeks for the Valentine holiday. We are creating our Urban Hobo bindle packs full of delicious cookies.
Bindle packs you ask? Bindle packs are a very big part of the Hobo life.  [A bindle pack is where hobos carried all their worldly possessions]

 Juan and I LOVE our product name “Urban Hobo”…URBAN for the love of city-close living and HOBO… for the true hobo held very high standards, values and ethics. If you saw our past post, “Urban Hobo Cookies are here”…I talked about the “Hobo Code” and how the hobo lived to a higher standard than the average traveler that lived on the streets.

We are in the process of creating our fun fabulous website filled with eclectic art and “artful” edibles. (wink wink smiley face) I’ll keep you posted and announce our launch date soon.

In the meantime…we are gearing up for the “heart filled” holiday and taking orders for our delectable cookies. You love peanut butter and white chocolate??/You’ll love these. AND they will come bundled in a bindle pack with your choice of kerchief. (Pink Paisley, light pink, white, shocking pink [not shown} and white)

Also we have created a heart tag with your choice of saying…1) I LOVE YOU… or 2) RUN AWAY WITH ME.

If you are interested in purchasing a hobo pack for your loved one, please contact me (listed below) with color choice of kerchief and tag and I can have it shipped to you quickly! The cost of a bindle pack is only $15.00 plus shipping. Your sweetheart will receive two dozen (sometimes we throw an extra cookie or two) in a bindle pack.

You can email me with some basic (kerchief color and tag preference) info and I will call you to get additional details. We do accept credit card payments (Visa, Mastercard, American Express and Discover)!



We have other colors and black & white too

 Contact me! I would love to fill an order or two!

Shawn Smith
shawn@urban-hobo.com
489-215-2329

 

Thank you for your orders!-Urban Hobo Cookies

Well….I’ve been spending many nights mixing up batches of my cookies and today had several orders ready for delivery. Thank you so much for your orders.

These are simple yet awesome cookies. If you love peanut butter and white chocolate you’ll love these!

I love this time of year as so many spend time creating fabulous treats for friends and family. For me…I would much rather receive a homemade treat from someone than any pricey store bought item. Don’t get me wrong…. I love anyone who takes time to buy me or make me something. Anyone who thinks of me as someone special to deliver a gift is always appreciated. However, nothing says Christmas and how much they care than a homemade or handmade gift.

I hope this holiday season is finding your home full of happiness and love.

 
1 Comment

Posted by on December 17, 2011 in bakery, cookies, desserts, Homemade, sweets, treats, urban hobos

 
 
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